WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20

COMMEMORATION DAY

The Impact of World War I on Today’s Conflicts

The first day of Lillehammer Dialogue City is a look to the past, with a day of commemoration. 2018 marks 100 years since the end of World War I. In 1918, after four years of war, Europe was left in ruins. Millions of young men were slaughtered in the battlefields across Europe while thousands disappeared across the seas. The old European order had fallen. What can WWI teach us about how we address current conflicts? What is the impact of WWI in our time?

The Commemoration Day is organized by the Inland University for Applied Sciences and Nansen Center for Peace and Dialogue.

09.00-10.00 | Kulturhuset Banken | interpretation to English

KEYNOTE SPEECH: THE IMPACT OF WWI IN OUR TIME

 

2018 marks 100 years since the end of WWI – a war that left Europe with the heavy toll of millions of lives lost, newly established borders and depleted economies. The key note sheds light on the importance of learning from the past and the inherent dangers of not doing so.

Alfredo Zamudio, Director, Nansen Center for Peace and Dialogue.
Music by Carol Kvande,
professional singer and teacher with vast experience on cultural projects

10.00-11.30 | Kulturhuset Banken | interpretation to English

WWI AND NORWAY – NEUTRAL BUT NOT ALOOF

What are the similarities of the economic benefits as seen in WWI with the profiteers of conflicts and wars today? How did Norway benefit economically and politically by being a neutral ally in WWI?

Norway was referred to as “The Neutral Ally” during World War I, given its neutral stance despite leanings toward Britain in economic matters concerning Norway’s shipping fleet and fish supplies. Less than a year into the war, Norway negotiated trade agreements with Great Britain and in April 1917 through the “Tonnage Agreement”, Norway gave Britain full control over the Norwegian Merchant Fleet.

Nik Brandal, Assistant Professor, Bjørknes University College and Eirik Brazier, Associate Professor, University of South-Eastern Norway.
Moderated by Trond Feiring, Lecturer, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences.

12.00-13.00 | Kulturhuset Banken | interpretation to English

THE WAR THAT CHANGED THE MIDDLE EAST – A LEGACY OF INSTABILITY

Globally, the Middle East is currently both the source and the recipient of the largest number of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) as millions of people have been displaced by war and conflict.

The Middle East’s instability has its roots in the battles fought across the Middle East and the eventual defeat of Turkey’s Ottoman Empire at the close of World War I. A century later, the instability of these former Turkish territories remains one of the clearest legacies of World War I. Can we trace the origin of some of today’s problems to the tragedies of the past?

Jon Nordenson, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages in conversation with Jørgen Jensehaugen, Associate Professor, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences

14.30-16.00 | Kulturhuset Banken | interpretation to English

THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION – THE COLLAPSE OF AN EMPIRE AND THE RISE OF A NEW ORDER

The dire effects of World War I in Russia, with nearly 2 million Russian soldiers killed, another 5 million wounded and the collapse of its economy gave rise to the Russian Revolution in 1917. Was the collapse of the Russian Empire the main determinant for a century of wars and conflicts across the globe?

Hallvard Tjelmeland, Professor, Department of Archaeology, History, Religious studies and Theology, The Arctic University of Norway and Alfredo Zamudio, Director, NCPD.
Moderated by Paul Knutsen, Professor, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences.

16.00-17.30 | Kulturhuset Banken | interpretation to English

THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS – A WORLD OF NEW NORMS AND FAILED DIPLOMACIES

Why did the League of Nations fail to create peace? What could have been done differently?

The League of Nations was founded in 1920 during the Paris Peace Conference that ended WWI. It was the first-ever international organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace and prevent wars. A set of 14 principles were designed to remove the causes of another great war and to provide a forum where disputes could be discussed and mediated. Despite this effort, the League of Nations was unable to prevent another great war and almost three decades later, the League of Nations was replaced by the United Nations (UN).

Hilde Restad, Associate Professor, Bjørknes University College and Marta Stachurska-Kounta, Lecturer, Faculty of Humanities, Sports and Educational Science, University of South-Eastern Norway.
Moderated by Micheline Grung, Assistant Professor, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences.
Host for the day: Olav Brostrup Müller, Head of Cultural Affairs, Lillehammer

14.00 | Sigrid Undset Plass

STREET CONCERTS

The Norwegian Seamen Choir was founded in 1959 and is a renowned Norwegian choir and they often take part in official ceremonies related to seamen, ships and shipping organizatons.

Moddi is a Norwegian artist, author and social activist. In 2016 he released the album Unsongs – a collection of 12 forbidden songs from all over the world.

19.30-21.00 | Lillehammer church | interpretation to English | formal attire

WWI COMMEMORATION

In memory of 2000 Norwegian sailors who perished in WWI

 

2018 marks 100 years since the end of World War I. Millions of people lost their lives in this war, including over 2,000 Norwegian sailors. World War I has had a large impact on many of today’s conflicts, including situations where Norway is involved through humanitarian aid, development, military and political work.

In an official ceremony to mark the end of WWI, the Cit of Lillehammer, the County of Oppland and the Nansen Center for Peace and Dialogue will host a ceremony to remember those who perished.

The commemoration will take place in Lillehammer church. Descendants of sailors from World War I will be present and joined by representatives from the Parliament, the Government and regional- and local authorities. After the speeches and music, the ceremony ends with the laying of a wreath of roses in memory of those who perished.

Espen Granberg Johnsen, Mayor of Lillehammer; Tone W. Trøen, President of the Storting; Solveig Fiske, Bishop of the Diocese of Hamar; Kjersti C. Klæboe, Director General, Ministry of Defence.

Music by Camilla Granlien, Norwegian folk singer and The Norwegian Seamen Choir.